Happy Birthday, Fanny Burney!

We haven’t had a birthday in a while, so happy birthday, Frances (Fanny) Burney! Fanny, a novelist, diarist, and playwright was born in Lynn Regis (now King’s Lynn) on 13 June 1752 to a musical historian and his wife, Esther. Fanny was the third of six children and was self-educated, though her sisters, both of whom were favored by their father, were given expensive educations … Continue reading Happy Birthday, Fanny Burney!

Death Comes to Pemberley: The Trial

lipsync-pemberley-1Previously on Death Comes to Pemberley: Wickham was brought before an inquest, which declared him a murderer, so now he gets a full-blown trial. He’s also apparently been a busy boy, having fathered a child with Louisa Bidwell under a fake name. Georgiana’s decided she’s being forced to marry Col Fitz, so Henry’s heart is broken and things are super tense between Lizzy and Darcy.

Wickham, less smug now, tries to settle in his jail cell, but it’s no good. He flashes back on time spent with Louisa, walking through the woods and probably carving that heart in the tree. He seems sad.

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Death Comes to Pemberley: The Plot Thickens

142630_600Previously on Death Comes to Pemberley: Lizzy and Darcy just wanted to hold their annual ball, but then Lydia showed up screaming her head off, Wickham was found with a dead body in the woods, and things got complicated really fast.

Darcy looks down at his sleeping son. The boy wakes and smiles up at his dad and Darcy smiles back, tucks him in, and heads out.

Lizzy washes her face and gets ready for the day, pausing to look at the letter fragments she fished out of the fire. She looks out the window and sees men poking around at the edge of the woods. A little later she goes to play with the kid and seems disappointed to hear that Darcy’s already been to see him and gone.

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Pride and Prejudice

This is a good day for literature: on January 28, 1813, one of my all-time favorite books, Pride and Prejudice, was published by Thomas Egerton of Whitehall, who purchased the copyright from Jane Austen for £100. Austen wrote the first draft of the novel—then called First Impressions—between October 1796 and August 1797. Her father asked a London bookseller named Thomas Cadell if he had any … Continue reading Pride and Prejudice