Trivia Tuesday: Weapons of War

This Week’s Question: Which weapon’s superiority over the crossbow was proven at the Battle of Crecy in 1346? Last Week’s Question: The scandalous marriage of Maria Walpole to the Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh led to the passage of what piece of royal legislation? Answer: Maria’s marriage (as well as that of the Duke of Cumberland, Gloucester’s older brother) led to the passing of the Royal … Continue reading Trivia Tuesday: Weapons of War

Monmouth’s Rebellion

On July 15, 1685, Monmouth’s Rebellion ended when James Scott, Duke of Monmouth and illegitimate son of Charles II, was executed in London for attempting to depose his uncle, James II, and seize the throne for himself. Monmouth was Charles’s eldest child and was born in Rotterdam in April 1649 while Charles was exiled during the Protectorate. He was handed over to William Crofts, 1st … Continue reading Monmouth’s Rebellion

Game of Thrones: Here Comes the Bride

Game-of-Thrones-S3E8-03Previously on Game of Thrones: Dany decided she wanted to free all the slaves in the next city in her path, Tyrion was forced into an engagement with Sansa, Gendry was handed over to Melisandre, and Arya found herself a hostage of the Hound.

Arya wakes, gets her bearings, and picks up a giant rock lying nearby before sneaking up on the sleeping Hound. She raises the rock above her head, ready to strike, but he wakes and tells her to go ahead and kill him, but if she fails to do so, he’ll break both her hands. She doesn’t kill him, and he doesn’t break her hands, by the look of it.

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The Village: Thy Will Be Done

village-483902808Hey everybody. I know I’ve been totally remiss this week, but I’ve been moving to a new flat. And even though this move (down two floors in the same building) was far less traumatic than the last one (Atlanta to Philadelphia to Scotland), it’s still exhausting, you know? And the new flat’s still chaotic, which drives me nuts, so if I’m a little bitchier than usual in this recap, I’m sorry.

Where were we? Right—Previously on The Village: Caro’s family took her baby away, which upset her quite a bit, as did George’s determination to march off to war, so she begged him to stay. Eyre was less determined to go—so much less so, he had to be forced into it. He went, giving Bert his camera, accompanied by Joe, who came back for a brief leave a fairly haunted man.

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Remembrance Sunday

On 11 November 1918, World War I–the horrific conflict everyone hoped would end all wars–ended with the signing of the Armistice in France. Ever since, the millions dead in that conflict and the ones that came before and after have been lovingly remembered on the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For weeks leading up to the day, poppy brooches start appearing on lapels–cheap paper … Continue reading Remembrance Sunday

The Battle of Stirling Bridge

On September 11, 1297, a Scottish army led by William Wallace and Andrew Moray met and defeated the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge, near Stirling on the River Forth. Stirling Bridge followed a Scottish defeat at the Battle of Dunbar in April 1296. The English victor, John de Warenne, thought he was facing a rabble at Stirling and didn’t really take proper precautions … Continue reading The Battle of Stirling Bridge

The Borgias: The Illusionist

Previously on The Borgias: Lucrezia’s sometime lover and babydaddy Paolo came to town and got to see her and the baby before Juan got pissed and killed him, disguising the death as a suicide.

Poor Paolo is still hanging in the square, attracting some attention, including that of Cesare, who tries to hustle his sister out of there. She notices the crowd, however, and then sees its cause and completely falls to pieces in her grief. So I guess we know what the gossip in the square’s going to be for the next week or so. Cesare finds a suicide note that Juan planted on the body, because he’s both a moron and an asshole. Moron because most people of Paolo’s class at the time (including Paolo, as we know) were illiterate and asshole because suicide was (and still is) taken very seriously by the Catholic church and meant you couldn’t have a Christian burial. It basically meant you were consigned to hell for all eternity. Juan, you are such a douche. None of us are going to be sorry to see you die in the season finale (sorry, historical spoiler!). Now, Lucrezia knows Paolo couldn’t read or write, so the note clues her in to the fact that something is seriously amiss here. She gets up and starts to move away from the body, but then faints. Cesare picks her up and carries her home, telling one of their guards to take care of the body.

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The War of Jenkins’ Ear

If you’re going to have a war, you may as well name it something interesting and memorable, right? On October 23, 1739, the awesomely named War of Jenkins’ Ear began when Britain declared war on Spain, despite Prime Minister Robert Walpole’s reservations. The unusual name wasn’t made official until more than 100 years after the conflict. It refers to an incident in 1731, when the … Continue reading The War of Jenkins’ Ear

The Conquerors

This is a big day for battles. On October 14, 1066, William the Conqueror and his Norman army defeated King Harold II’s exhausted troops, essentially beginning the Norman Conquest of England. The Battle of Hastings—which was actually fought a good six miles northwest of Hastings at Senlac Hill, capped off a pretty chaotic year in England. Edward the Confessor died in January, and his throne … Continue reading The Conquerors

The Spanish Armada

On May 28, 1588, the ill-fated Spanish Armada started sailing out of Lisbon, heading for the English Channel. The fleet, which consisted of 151 ships, 8,000 sailors, and 18,000 soldiers, was so huge it took two days for the whole thing to make its way out of Lisbon. The English attempted some last-minute diplomacy, but when that failed they battened down the hatches and sent … Continue reading The Spanish Armada