The Village: Closure

Bert MiddletonPreviously on The Village: Joe came home, seriously shell-shocked, which ended with him getting shot for desertion.

Old Bert watches video of the village’s World War I memorial being dismantled while he recalls the day and how the villagers insisted on being the ones to do it. Please tell me they reconstructed it. I mean, who the hell just takes down a war memorial like that? That seems so terribly wrong to me.

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The Village: Thy Will Be Done

village-483902808Hey everybody. I know I’ve been totally remiss this week, but I’ve been moving to a new flat. And even though this move (down two floors in the same building) was far less traumatic than the last one (Atlanta to Philadelphia to Scotland), it’s still exhausting, you know? And the new flat’s still chaotic, which drives me nuts, so if I’m a little bitchier than usual in this recap, I’m sorry.

Where were we? Right—Previously on The Village: Caro’s family took her baby away, which upset her quite a bit, as did George’s determination to march off to war, so she begged him to stay. Eyre was less determined to go—so much less so, he had to be forced into it. He went, giving Bert his camera, accompanied by Joe, who came back for a brief leave a fairly haunted man.

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The Village: Scenes from Rural Life

village_4839028It’s going to be interesting recapping this and Game of Thrones at the same time, because everything seems to indicate that they’re very, very different shows. Nearly polar opposites, in fact. GOT is huge in scope, swooping across the seven kingdoms, interweaving the stories of dozens of main characters scattered all over the place. The Village, by comparison (as the name indicates) is tiny, focusing on one tucked-away spot way out in the middle of nowhere, and the people who live there. This does not appear to be a plot-driven programme, and I’m expecting it to be fairly short on action. This is about people’s lives as they lived them. There is no tension and handwringing over an entail, little chance of a big battle scene, and the sex is distinctly untitillating. And that’s perfectly fine—I’m not saying that this is bad because of all that. Quite the contrary, it’s quite good in an almost voyeuristic sort of way—we’re just peeping in on some of the most personal moments of ordinary people’s everyday lives. But you have to approach it understanding that, or you’ll be bored to tears. It’ll be interesting to see how this unfolds.

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